top of page
13.jpg
AdobeStock_543909749_edited.jpg

Morgan James, NY

Full grown adults and VERY lively!!

"I've purchased Neocaridina shrimp from several other mail order companies, and this one has been the BEST: all the shrimp were full grown (3/4 to almost an inch) and OMG are they ACTIVE!! After drip acclimating to my tank water, I introduced them to my tank and they IMMEDIATELY began flying all over the place."

Drip Acclimation Process

Drip acclimation serves as a crucial introduction process for aquarium fish and shrimp, providing a gradual transition that helps them adjust to new water parameters, minimizes stress, and promotes optimal health in their new environment.

01.

Prepare the Drip Line

Get a clean airline tubing and a drip acclimation kit or a simple knot. If you don't have a kit, tie a knot in the tubing to control the flow of water. Make sure the tubing is long enough to reach from the water source to the tank.

02.

Secure the Bag

Float the sealed bag containing your fish or shrimp in the tank for about 15 minutes to equalize the temperature. This helps them acclimate to the new water temperature without any sudden changes.

(DO NOT float breather bag for more than 15 minutes)

03.

Start the Drip

Open the bag and carefully release its contents into a bucket. While doing so, inspect and remove any deceased fish or shrimp to ensure a smooth and healthy acclimation process.

Set up an acclimation tube connecting the tank to the bucket, ensuring the bucket is positioned below the tank to allow for a downward water flow.

04.

Adjust the Drip Rate

Adjust the flow of water through the tubing so that it's a slow, steady drip into the bag. You can use a knot or a clamp to control the rate. Aim for about 2-4 drips per second. This slow introduction helps the fish and shrimp gradually get accustomed to the new water parameters.

05.

Monitor and Transfer

Let the drip acclimation process continue for about 1-2 hours. Monitor the water level in the bag, and if it becomes too full, you can remove some water to prevent overflow. Once the water volume has doubled or tripled, carefully transfer the fish or shrimp into the tank using a net, being mindful not to add water from the bag into the tank.

Water Parameters

Keep it Steady, Stay Safe!

Ensuring a happy home for your fish, shrimp, and crayfish starts with getting the water just right. Let's dive into the key parameters that keep them healthy and thriving.

NEOCARIDINA

  1. TDS (Total Dissolved Solids):

    • Ideal Range: 150 to 300 ppm (parts per million)

    • Neocaridina shrimp generally do well in water with moderate TDS levels. It's essential to strike a balance, avoiding extremes in either high or low TDS.

  2. Temperature:

    • Ideal Range: 68°F to 78°F (20°C to 26°C)

    • Stable and consistent temperature is crucial to prevent stress and promote overall health.

  3. pH Level:

    • Ideal Range: 6.5 to 7.5

    • Neocaridina shrimp prefer slightly acidic to neutral pH levels.

  4. GH (General Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 6 to 10 dGH (degrees of General Hardness)

    • Shrimp require a moderate level of hardness for proper molting and shell development.

  5. KH (Carbonate Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 3 to 8 dKH (degrees of Carbonate Hardness)

    • Carbonate hardness helps stabilize pH levels and provides essential minerals.

  6. Ammonia and Nitrite:

    • Should be at or near zero. Neocaridina shrimp are sensitive to ammonia and nitrite, which can be harmful to their health.

  7. Nitrate:

    • Keep nitrate levels low, ideally below 20 ppm. Regular water changes help control nitrate accumulation.

  8. Copper:

    • Ensure that there is no detectable copper in the aquarium water. Copper is toxic to shrimp.

FRESHWATER FISHES

  1. Temperature:

    • Ideal Range: 72°F to 78°F (22°C to 26°C)

    • Consistent and stable temperatures within this range support the metabolic needs of nano fish.

  2. pH Level:

    • Ideal Range: 6.5 to 7.5

    • Slightly acidic to neutral pH promotes overall well-being for most nano fish species.

  3. GH (General Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 6 to 10 dGH (degrees of General Hardness)

    • A moderate general hardness level supports proper physiological functions.

  4. KH (Carbonate Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 3 to 8 dKH (degrees of Carbonate Hardness)

    • Maintaining a stable carbonate hardness helps buffer pH changes.

  5. Ammonia and Nitrite:

    • Should be at or near zero to prevent stress and health issues in nano fish.

  6. Nitrate:

    • Ideal Range: Below 20 ppm

    • Regular water changes help control nitrate levels and maintain water quality.

  7. Copper:

    • Ensure that there is no detectable copper in the aquarium water, as it can be harmful to fish.

CARIDINA

  1. TDS (Total Dissolved Solids):

    • Ideal Range: 120 to 180 ppm (parts per million)

    • Caridina shrimp, such as Crystal Red Shrimp, prefer slightly lower TDS levels compared to Neocaridina shrimp. Maintaining a stable TDS is crucial for their well-being.

  2. Temperature:

    • Ideal Range: 72°F to 78°F (22°C to 26°C)

    • Stable and consistent temperature is crucial for Caridina shrimp to prevent stress and promote overall health.

  3. pH Level:

    • Ideal Range: 6.0 to 7.0

    • Caridina shrimp thrive in slightly acidic to neutral pH levels.

  4. GH (General Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 4 to 6 dGH (degrees of General Hardness)

    • Caridina shrimp prefer lower general hardness levels compared to Neocaridina shrimp.

  5. KH (Carbonate Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 0 to 2 dKH (degrees of Carbonate Hardness)

    • Caridina shrimp are sensitive to high carbonate hardness, and a low KH helps maintain stable and slightly acidic conditions.

  6. Ammonia and Nitrite:

    • Should be at or near zero. Caridina shrimp are sensitive to ammonia and nitrite, which can be harmful to their health.

  7. Nitrate:

    • Ideal Range: Below 10 ppm

    • Keeping nitrate levels low is essential for the health of Caridina shrimp. Regular water changes help control nitrate accumulation.

  8. Copper:

    • Ensure that there is no detectable copper in the aquarium water. Copper is toxic to shrimp.

CRAYFISH

  1. TDS (Total Dissolved Solids):

    • Ideal Range: 120 to 140 ppm

    • Maintaining stable TDS levels within this range is beneficial for the health and well-being of crayfish.

  2. Temperature:

    • Ideal Range: 65°F to 75°F (18°C to 24°C)

    • Crayfish generally prefer slightly cooler temperatures compared to tropical fish.

  3. pH Level:

    • Ideal Range: 7.0 to 8.0

    • Maintaining a neutral to slightly alkaline pH is suitable for most crayfish species.

  4. GH (General Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 6 to 12 dGH (degrees of General Hardness)

    • Crayfish can tolerate a moderate range of general hardness levels.

  5. KH (Carbonate Hardness):

    • Ideal Range: 3 to 10 dKH (degrees of Carbonate Hardness)

    • A stable carbonate hardness helps maintain proper pH levels for crayfish.

  6. Ammonia and Nitrite:

    • Should be at or near zero to ensure the health and well-being of crayfish.

  7. Nitrate:

    • Ideal Range: Below 20 ppm

    • Regular water changes are beneficial for controlling nitrate levels.

  8. Copper:

    • Ensure that there is no detectable copper in the aquarium water, as it can be harmful to crayfish.

Be the first to know

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive news and updates.

Thanks for submitting!

Contact

Have a question? Drop us a line

Thank you for Reaching Out!

bottom of page